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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

4 edition of The Douglas-fir tussock moth found in the catalog.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth

United States. Forest Service.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth

a synthesis

by United States. Forest Service.

  • 62 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service : for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off. in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas fir tussock moth

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by Martha H. Brookes, R. W. Stark, Robert W. Campbell
    SeriesTechnical bulletin - Dept. of Agriculture ; no. 1585, Technical bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 1585
    ContributionsBrookes, Martha H, Stark, R. W., 1922-, Campbell, Robert W
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxvii, 321 p. :
    Number of Pages321
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14837847M

    Douglas-fir tussock moth larvae have to ingest the virus in order for it to infect the larval host. The virus requires a living host or the DNA of live host cells in order to replicate itself. Under field conditions, tussock moth larvae ingest the polyhedral inclusion bodies containing virions or . Douglas-fircan cause problems because the larval hairs tussockMovement of Douglas-fir tussock moth into moth during outbreaks. ©Colorado State University Extension. 3/ Revised 7/ Caterpillars of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), chew the needles of spruces, Douglas fir and true firs.

    Douglas-fir tussock moth spends the winter as eggs, laid within a mass covered with the hairs of the female. Eggs hatch in the spring, often in late May. The small, hairy caterpillars migrate to the new growth. There also tends to be a migration to the top of the tree and many newly emerged larvae may subsequently be dispersed by wind. Web Search Engines for Articles on "Douglas-fir Tussock Moth" WorldCat; Google Scholar; Google Books; ; Additional Sources of Information Related to "Insects" Alberta Lepidopterists' Guild Bees - Discover Life Bumble Bee Species Accounts at Montana Entomology Collection Bumble Bee Watch.

    Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga)-Douglas-fir tussock moth. Douglas-fir tussock moth. Orgyia pseudotsugata McDunnough. Immature one in back) and lighter tufts along their back. The hairs from tussock moth caterpillars break off easily and may cause skin or respiratory irritation. The larvae start at branch tips at the top of the tree and work down. Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Biology and Life Cycle (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth and Tussockosis (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Treatment and Control In My Backyard (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth NPV Virus Information Sheet (PDF) History of Douglas-fir Tussock Moth in South-East BC (PDF) DFTM Treatment Maps; Back to Douglas-fir Tussock Moth.


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The Douglas-fir tussock moth by United States. Forest Service. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth: a Synthesis [M. H.; Stark, R.W.; Campbell, R.W.; Eds. Brookes] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth. Douglas-fir tussock moth control by the homeowner (Oregon State University. Extension Service. FS) [Joseph Capizzi] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Joseph Capizzi.

Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a native defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and true firs (Abies spp.), though will rarely feed on planted Colorado blue spruce in urban areas.

The moth is a native species found throughout mixed-conifer forests in the western United States and southern British Columbia. The Douglas-fir tussock moth creates snags and down wood by severely defoliating and causing the death of all sizes of true fir and Douglas-fir trees.

It also interacts with other disturbance agents, especially bark beetles, to cause host tree mortality. Successful management of the Douglas-fir tussock moth depends on carefully monitoring populations within high-hazard stands during the non-outbreak and building phases. Once an outbreak begins, viable treatment options decrease significantly.

Orgyia pseudotsugata. Pest description and damage The adult male is brown to gray and about 1 inch across and flies during the day in search of the wingless female moth. The larvae feed on pine needles and the mature larvae are about an inch long, hairy, gray or light brown, with black heads.

Hosts: Douglas-fir, white fir and spruce Figure 8. Adult male (left) and femail (right) Douglas-fir moth. Symptoms/Signs: The caterpillar of the Douglas-fir tussock moth is grayish with brightly colored tufts of hair and a shiny black are also two long horns of black hairs behind the head and another at the rear of the body.

Forest Health Alert Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata): Outbreak status of a conifer defoliating caterpillar Importance. The Douglas-fir tussock moth (DFTM) is a defoliating caterpillar that can severely damage Douglas-fir, true fir, and spruce trees in the western United States.

In eastern. The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a native insect found throughout the range of its Douglas-fir North Idaho removed approximately 14 million Douglas and true fir hosts in the western states and British Columbia.

It is one of many conifer-feeding insects that contribute to. The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), is an important defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir, true fir and other conifers in the Rocky Mountain region. Feeding by the larvae can cause complete defoliation of heavily infested trees.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a common and periodically destructive solitary defoliator. Occasionally, localized outbreaks occur on individual or small groups of Douglas-fir or spruce in urban settings both on the coast and in the interior.

Severe defoliation by the tussock moth may result in tree mortality, top-kill or weakened trees, making. Douglas-fir tussock moths are defoliators—they eat the leaves off of plants. More precisely, immature caterpillars climb to the top of the tree or building where they hatched, spin a silk web to sail on, float on the wind until they land, and eat any leaves they can find.

The sex pheromone of the Douglass-fir tussock moth Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough) has been isolated and identified as (Z)heneicosenone. This compound and its E isomer have been synthesized and are highly potent in laboratory bioassays and field by: The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a native insect in the low-lying, dry belt Douglas-fir regions of southern British Columbia.

It is not an introduced species. It feeds primarily on Douglas-fir, and occasionally on ponderosa pine and western larch.

Ornamental spruce and pine may also be affected in urban. Surviving stands are invariably in a weakened state, and very susceptible to other insects (such as the Douglas-Fir Beetle) and onally, about 20% of people and animals are allergic to Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth hairs.

These hairs are present on the larvae, the cast larval skins, the egg masses, the cocoons, and the female moth. The Douglas Fir tussock moth is a common pest in Colorado. The Tussock moth caterpillar (Orgyia psuedotsugata) eat the needles of spruce, Douglas fir, and true fir trees.

These caterpillars cause defoliation, which occurs rapidly from the top of the tree down. Tree tops can often be completely destroyed after a single season. Get this from a library. Douglas-fir tussock moth handbook: rearing the Douglas-fir tussock moth.

[Clarence G Thompson; Linda J Peterson; United States. Department of Agriculture.]. Get this from a library. Douglas-fir tussock moth: an annotated bibliography.

[Robert W Campbell; Lorna C Youngs; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.)] -- "This annotated bibliography includes references to papers. Each deals in some way with either the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), or a related species.

Movement of Douglas-fir tussock moth into new locations around the state sometimes result from humans incidentally moving construction materials or other items that have attached egg masses. Life History and Habits Douglas-fir tussock moth spends the winter as an egg within the egg mass.

Eggs hatch in the spring, often in late May. Treatment Options for Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth About Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a defoliator of Douglas-fir, true fir (Abies spp.) and spruce (Engelmann and Colorado blue) trees.

Native to Colorado’s forests, the insect also may impact Colorado blue spruce in urban settings. Douglas Fir Tussock Moth Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough, ). Family: Erebidae Subfamily: Lymantriinae.The Douglas-fir tussock moth, O. pseudotsugata, feeds primarily on Douglas-fir and true firs.

Lighter-colored tufts of hair along the back, red spots on top, and an orange stripe along each side distinguish its mature larvae from those of the rusty tussock moth. Life cycle. Tussock moths overwinter as eggs.Title.

A case study of a Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak and stand conditions 10 years later / Related Titles. Series: USDA Forest Service research paper PNW ; By.

Wickman, Boyd E. Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.).